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Nevada

NRS 125.460 State policy. The legislature declares that it is the policy of this state:
     1.  To ensure that minor children have frequent associations and a continuing relationship with both parents after the parents have become separated or have dissolved their marriage; and
     2.  To encourage such parents to share the rights and responsibilities of child rearing.
     (Added to NRS by 1981, 283)-(Substituted in revision for NRS 125.132)
     NRS 125.465 Married parents have joint custody until otherwise ordered by court. If a court has not made a determination regarding the custody of a child and the parents of the child are married to each other, each parent has joint legal custody of the child until otherwise ordered by a court of competent jurisdiction.
     (Added to NRS by 1993, 1425)
     NRS 125.480 Best interest of child; preferences; considerations of court; presumption when court determines that parent or person residing with child is perpetrator of domestic violence.
     1.  In determining custody of a minor child in an action brought under this chapter, the sole consideration of the court is the best interest of the child. If it appears to the court that joint custody would be in the best interest of the child, the court may grant custody to the parties jointly.
     2.  Preference must not be given to either parent for the sole reason that the parent is the mother or the father of the child.
     3.  The court shall award custody in the following order of preference unless in a particular case the best interest of the child requires otherwise:
     (a) To both parents jointly pursuant to NRS 125.490 or to either parent. If the court does not enter an order awarding joint custody of a child after either parent has applied for joint custody, the court shall state in its decision the reason for its denial of the parent's application. When awarding custody to either parent, the court shall consider, among other factors, which parent is more likely to allow the child to have frequent associations and a continuing relationship with the noncustodial parent.
     (b) To a person or persons in whose home the child has been living and where the child has had a wholesome and stable environment.
     (c) To any person related within the third degree of consanguinity to the child whom the court finds suitable and able to provide proper care and guidance for the child, regardless of whether the relative resides within this state.
     (d) To any other person or persons whom the court finds suitable and able to provide proper care and guidance for the child.
     4.  In determining the best interest of the child, the court shall consider, among other things:
     (a) The wishes of the child if the child is of sufficient age and capacity to form an intelligent preference as to his custody;
     (b) Any nomination by a parent or a guardian for the child; and
     (c) Whether either parent or any other person seeking custody has engaged in an act of domestic violence against the child, a parent of the child or any other person residing with the child.
     NRS 125.490 Joint custody.
     1.  There is a presumption, affecting the burden of proof, that joint custody would be in the best interest of a minor child if the parents have agreed to an award of joint custody or so agree in open court at a hearing for the purpose of determining the custody of the minor child or children of the marriage.
     2.  The court may award joint legal custody without awarding joint physical custody in a case where the parents have agreed to joint legal custody.
     3.  For assistance in making a determination whether an award of joint custody is appropriate, the court may direct that an investigation be conducted.


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